1045 Haro Street is one of Downtown Vancouver’s urban anomalies. Despite its conventional alignment to Vancouver’s urban grid, its circulation isn’t obviously legible. East of Burrard, Smithe Street is aligned with Stovold Lane, but west it mysteriously and imperceptibly transitions into Haro. As Smithe Street gently banks to the north around Stovold Lane to intersect with Haro, the typical pattern of streets and lanes in the West End is disrupted.
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1045 Haro’s location at the eastern edge of the West End and the north limit of the Burrard Corridor has left it resistant to conventional approaches to development. What exists is an aspirational site, left behind by exciting progress in the immediate vicinity and elsewhere in the West End. As a result, 1045 Haro remains hidden from both view and planning policy.
The orphaned condition of 1045 Haro is exacerbated by the fire hall across the street and the large hotel at the end of the block. Despite its proximity to Robson Street, the vicinity of 1045 Haro is an area not frequented by pedestrians. In the near future, 1045 Haro will be dwarfed by massive developments to the south that will dramatically change the character of Thurlow Street.
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To address the myriad challenges facing 1045 Haro, a successful project requires an unconventional approach. Two key City policies, the Rezoning Policy for the West End, read in conjunction with the West End Community Plan; and the Higher Buildings Policy, have shaped our proposal. Our approach to the project is defined by five key steps: 1. Shape the urban space; 2. Support the community with rental housing, daycare, and a public plaza; 3.  Densify the edge of the West End; 4. Respond to the view cone; and 5. Articulate the design. By building on its context and bringing value and creative design to the site, we found a distinct and compelling way to satisfy the intent of each policy.
The lounge was constructed within a windowless space in the Vancouver International Airport building. To counteract the lack of any connection to the outdoors and to create a memorable environment, a richly textured interior of wood and glass was created. Undulating interior walls and ceilings are framed with maple ribs, between which are set alternating assemblies of maple battens and laminated patterned glass. Ambient back lighting on a dynamic dimming system animates the glass panels. The calming experience of the gently modulating lighting system shimmering behind the textured glass evokes a quality similar to that of natural daylight.
It can be relocated to virtually any outdoor site, where it will provide the basics for everyday life: sleeping for two, kitchen, shower, and composting toilet. Made of a variety of materials and premanufactured components, it generates its own electricity, collects and distributes rainwater, and composts human waste using only the natural dynamics of the site.
The project was constructed in 1998 for the Fabrications Exhibition at the Wexner Center for the Arts, in Columbus, Ohio.
The site is a constructed peninsula in Beacon NY, built from fill to support industrial uses on the waterfront in the 1800’s. As industrial activity on site waned, the site evolved into an overgrown, riparian habitat. For Scenic Hudson, this represented an opportunity to transform a degraded site into a vital, accessible environment.
The context to the north and south of the site takes two forms. The north is urban, consisting of a small harbour with a park, ferry terminal, and train station. The south, in contrast, is natural.
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Long Dock Beacon responds directly to these complimentary conditions. The north site is developed as an urban waterfront, forming the south side of the harbour. A boardwalk on the water’s edge runs the length of the site, from a renovated barn community space to a large civic plaza. The south site integrates recreational and educational activities with restored and expanded ecologies, including upland, meadow, wetland, intertidal, and subtidal zones. Public accessibility is promoted with a network of trails and walkways that interconnect and circumnavigate the site, linking site amenities with Beacon’s vital public infrastructure and cultural tourism destinations.
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The 850-foot long hotel and conference centre occupies the middle of the site, forming a threshold between the urban north and natural south. On the ground floor, exterior portals provide entry to, and allow free passage perpendicularly through, the building. Along the south side of the building is a waterway that mediates between the building and the adjacent meadow, extending the waterfront condition deep into the site. Running the length of this waterway is a continuous veranda, allowing ground-floor hotel activities to spill outdoors. This veranda is incorporated as part of a major public walkway that begins at the railway overpass, crosses a pedestrian bridge, continues down a site-scaled staircase, and follows the veranda to a large outdoor deck at the west end of the building, thus providing a pedestrian thoroughfare from Beacon to the edge of the Hudson River.
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The 148-room hotel and conference centre caters to both weekday business and weekend recreational guests. A bistro, wellness centre, and restaurant are on the ground floor along with hotel reception and back-of-house. The guestrooms, conference centre, ballroom, and spa are located on the upper two floors, with entrances along the pedestrian thoroughfare.
The hotel rooms are built as modules, so that they can be factory produced off-site, offering significant schedule and cost savings along with better quality control through shop fabrication. Several strategies are employed to mediate the extreme length of the guestroom corridor, including two-storey top-lit green courts that are regularly located along its length.
A wide variety of passive and active technologies ensure that the hotel and conference centre are economically and sustainably operated.

Patkau

1564 West 6th Ave Vancouver BC V6J 1R2 Canada

+1 604.683.7633 | info@patkau.ca

We gratefully acknowledge that we work on unceded xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) territories. 

Patkau

1564 West 6th Ave Vancouver BC V6J 1R2 Canada

Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territories

+1 604.683.7633 | info@patkau.ca

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